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In first place is:

6 East Art Therapy Group, Kings County Hospital with The Phoenix Rises

This artwork, The Phoenix Rises, was created by 8 adolescents in an art therapy session at Kings County Hospital Center. The teenagers were asked to write about and share their experiences of violence in their lives. The group quickly found out through this shared experience that as a collective, they had been victims and survivors of many forms of violence, including domestic violence, physical, mental and sexual abuse, gang-affiliated violence, and bullying. As a group they decided to create an artwork about survival and having a community come together rather than by torn apart by violence.

In second place is:

Rachel Sacks with Dear Endia

Ever draw a portrait of a dead person?

Wonder what she’d say as you

rub reds into the browns of her cheeks and

ask yourself

what the timber of her voice would sound like

if you could ask for her permission

to make this portrait.

Dear Endia, dead at 14,

shot over a boy whose name you

wouldn’t even have remembered had you

reached my 24.

I look back on teen years,

thank God enemies used

words to wound rather than guns,

borrowed from uncles, stolen from gods,

in this god-forsaken gun-try.

I thank God there wasn’t a Facebook

to broadcast feuds like the one

you had so publicly.

Dear Endia,

I learned of your death when a

close friend and fellow teacher

posted on Facebook in your memory –

you, once her student,

before your family moved you

from another high school in Chicago’s

South Side for your Safety.

Safety.

What does it mean for a 14-year-old girl in

Chicago’s South Side to be safe?

I labor over drawing you –

devote hours on this Friday night to

get your face, smile, round cheeks right.

I pretend that creating a likeness can

somehow honor the lost years,

lost joys, lost memories,

lost high school graduation, lost college,

lost partner, lost family,

lost wedding, lost career, lost dances,

lost daughters.

Hope terra cotta and burnt ochre can

capture your living colors.

I draw you and imagine the children I’ve

taught, wondering whether I’ll one day

have to resort to drawing their pictures

so their names will stay

in conversation a moment longer.

Endia,

drawing you

in this gun-forsaken

fantasy,

safer than reality –

in colored pencil.

The poem accompanies Endia’s portrait intentionally, as part and parcel of the work – something spontaneous that flowed from me as I drew her. I felt compelled to handwrite it rather than type it, like a diary entry. It felt too personal not to be guided my own hand, especially as I use my own hand to make this facsimile of Endia.

Imperfections here, in text and picture, are meaningful, as testaments to the humanness of making an elegy. I, human being, honor another, human being, all imperfect, all flawed, all deserving of life. It feels much more poignant and real to me to elegize a victim of violence as a human being, and not as an angel or a cause.

Additionally, the slight differences in my drawing of her, as compared with her actual image, are meaningful. They speak to the process of creating a portrait as elegy, and how we transmit images and stories to promote anti-violence work: from Chicago’s South Side, to my friend elsewhere in Chicago, to my apartment in South Harlem, to here in Crown Heights. 

Tied for third place are:
Andrew James with A Moment of Silence

NOISE – Sojourner Truth once said, “… where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter.” Society and its safety is “out of kilter”. When crimes are committed they are used as a means of silence, but everything comes to light. The people are restless to gain their rights or the justice they deserve, but when society or individuals try to compress them it makes things worse. Violence has a message which everyone can hear, no one is safe. No one can hide the anxiety, fear, shame, anger and hurt we all face. Everything has a sound heard around the world. 
But, there is another sound which is so unique – SILENCE. Silence, everything is calm. We come to our senses and as a people we unite. Peace is never forced but cool, calm and collected. We are not at the mercy of peace but on the same level where we can express ourselves to the fullest. Under violence one tries to be powerful over society (and fails) but in peace we are united. Silence is one of the best weapons against injustice. Yet, sound and silence cannot exist without one another.


And Patricia Persaud

Like love and hate, violence is somewhat a subjective matter. Though peace is preferred over violence, one does not exist without the other. Peace lives inside of violence like a caged dove, and until someone steps forward to set it free, violence prevails. Peace is more than an action or a state of mind. It’s a way of life, and requires unity of civilly engaged people. There is strength in community, like a flock of doves we coalesce to share a nonviolent way of living.
Zoom Info

Tied for third place are:

Andrew James with A Moment of Silence

NOISE – Sojourner Truth once said, “… where there is so much racket there must be something out of kilter.” Society and its safety is “out of kilter”. When crimes are committed they are used as a means of silence, but everything comes to light. The people are restless to gain their rights or the justice they deserve, but when society or individuals try to compress them it makes things worse. Violence has a message which everyone can hear, no one is safe. No one can hide the anxiety, fear, shame, anger and hurt we all face. Everything has a sound heard around the world.

But, there is another sound which is so unique – SILENCE. Silence, everything is calm. We come to our senses and as a people we unite. Peace is never forced but cool, calm and collected. We are not at the mercy of peace but on the same level where we can express ourselves to the fullest. Under violence one tries to be powerful over society (and fails) but in peace we are united. Silence is one of the best weapons against injustice. Yet, sound and silence cannot exist without one another.

And Patricia Persaud

Like love and hate, violence is somewhat a subjective matter. Though peace is preferred over violence, one does not exist without the other. Peace lives inside of violence like a caged dove, and until someone steps forward to set it free, violence prevails. Peace is more than an action or a state of mind. It’s a way of life, and requires unity of civilly engaged people. There is strength in community, like a flock of doves we coalesce to share a nonviolent way of living.

Contest Results Coming Soon!

Congratulations to all the winners of our Arts to End Violence youth contest (which we’ll be announcing later this afternoon).

First, second, and third prize winners can pick up their prizes at our office at 256 Kingston Avenue.

Please confirm with Marlies (talaym@crownheights.org) that you are accepting and picking up your prize before you come by.

All other artists can pick up their work at 256 Kingston Avenue within the next three weeks. Thank you to everyone for your participation!

By youth artist, Dean Brown. 
This piece has been hung. The whole show is hung. It’s opening tonight! Come see what our local artists have created. Come build community. Come celebrate Crown Heights. See you all there!!
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
ISO
1600
Aperture
f/3.5
Exposure
1/80th
Focal Length
40mm

By youth artist, Dean Brown. 

This piece has been hung. The whole show is hung. It’s opening tonight! Come see what our local artists have created. Come build community. Come celebrate Crown Heights. See you all there!!

This piece is by one of our youth contributors, Michael Ortega.
Come meet Michael and the rest of the artists; come build community; come talk change; come make it all happen with us!!
On Thursday night. In less than a week.
Arts to End Violence. Opening night.
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
ISO
1600
Aperture
f/4
Exposure
1/80th
Focal Length
48mm

This piece is by one of our youth contributors, Michael Ortega.

Come meet Michael and the rest of the artists; come build community; come talk change; come make it all happen with us!!

On Thursday night. In less than a week.

Arts to End Violence. Opening night.

Ernest, by Evan Schwartz

Evan is an art teacher who has spent the past ten years working for the Department of Education. He creates portraits of students he’s worked with, using collage, acrylic, polyurethane resin, and found materials. Evan’s work will be featured at our gallery opening on May 22nd at 1160 St. Johns Place. Evan will be there and so should you!!
Zoom Info
Camera
Canon EOS 5D Mark III
ISO
1600
Aperture
f/4
Exposure
1/80th
Focal Length
49mm

Ernest, by Evan Schwartz

Evan is an art teacher who has spent the past ten years working for the Department of Education. He creates portraits of students he’s worked with, using collage, acrylic, polyurethane resin, and found materials. Evan’s work will be featured at our gallery opening on May 22nd at 1160 St. Johns Place. Evan will be there and so should you!!

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